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OTV CHANNEL 189

   Ortonville Television is a community-based broadcast station, located on the dial at Charter Communication's Channel 189. The cable-access television station is owned and operated by Brandon Township and the Village of Ortonville. The OTV staff aims to provide a wide range of local programming and is dedicated to servicing our community with integrity, honesty and innovation. We look forward to watching us grow.

OTV Contact Greg Normand

OTV Contact Greg Normand

OTV 189 - Station Coordinator

Phone: 248-425-2849

Michiganders urged to take precautions against norovirus

   LANSING – Norovirus illness often peaks in winter. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) has identified increases in norovirus activity recently and is urging Michigan residents to take precautions to stay healthy.

    Although several viruses can cause vomiting and diarrhea, norovirus is the most common. These viruses are easily spread through food, by person-to-person contact or through contaminated surfaces. Therefore, take caution if someone in your household is ill. Norovirus infection is sometimes described “stomach flu” but it is not related to influenza (flu), a respiratory viral illness that can cause fever, cough, chills, headache, muscle aches, runny nose and sore throat.

   Norovirus often causes nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and stomach cramping, but infected people may also have a low-grade fever, headache, weakness and muscle aches. Symptoms can begin as early as 12 hours after exposure to the virus or as late as 72 hours. The symptoms of norovirus usually last one to three days. In most cases, ill individuals fully recover without medical attention.

   However, norovirus infection may result in hospitalization due to dehydration, especially in the very young and elderly. Individuals with severe diarrhea should drink lots of liquids. Symptoms that are not seen with norovirus infection are bloody diarrhea or high fever. If these symptoms develop, contact your medical provider.

    The best way to limit the spread of these viruses is frequent hand washing for at least 20 seconds using soap and warm running water, being sure to completely clean all areas of hands and under fingernails. This is especially important after using the bathroom or before preparing or eating food.

    Preventing contamination of food, drinks, water and ice is also very important. People who have been sick with vomiting and diarrhea should not prepare or serve food to others for at least three days after their symptoms are gone. One-third cup of bleach diluted with one gallon of water is the most effective way to disinfect surfaces. Bleach should be used in well-ventilated areas. Hand sanitizers are ineffective against the virus.  

   Norovirus can remain on a variety of surfaces for extended periods of time. Doorknobs, faucets, sinks, toilets, bath rails, phones, counters, chairs, tables, hand rails, light switches, keyboards and other high-touch surfaces should be disinfected more frequently, but especially within a 25-foot radius after a vomiting incident. Steam clean carpets and upholstery and launder clothes or linens contaminated with vomit or feces on the hottest setting. Additional information about norovirus can be found at CDC.gov/norovirus.

Radon test kits are half-price during National Radon Action Month

   PONTIAC – Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson and the Oakland County Health Division encourage residents to purchase radon test kits for only $5 this month to test their homes for the potentially harmful gas. Because January is National Radon Action Month, the Health Division recommends testing homes for radon during the cooler months as windows and doors remain closed.

   “Exposure to radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers and the second leading cause of lung cancer overall,” said Leigh-Anne Stafford, Oakland County health officer. “Since you cannot see or smell radon, testing your home is the only way to know if you and your family are at risk from radon exposure.”

      Radon test kits for homes are available for purchase at Health Division offices in Pontiac and Southfield:

  • North Oakland Health Center, 1200 N. Telegraph, Building 34E, Pontiac

  • South Oakland Health Center, 27725 Greenfield Road, Southfield

   Office hours are Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. To purchase more than 15 radon kits, please call 248-858-1312 to preorder. Please note that Health Division offices will be closed in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday, Jan. 21. After January, the cost of a radon test kit will return to $10. 

   Radon is a naturally-occurring, invisible, odorless gas that is usually harmless outdoors. When the gas is trapped in a building or home, however, it can be a health hazard. The Environmental Protection Agency says there is moderate potential for elevated radon levels in Oakland County homes.

   If high levels of radon are found, contact the Health Division’s Environmental Health Services at 248-858-1312 in Pontiac or 248-424-7191 in Southfield. Visit www.oakgov.com/health or www.epa.gov/radon for more information. For up-to-date public health information, visit www.oakgov.com/health, follow @publichealthOC on Facebook and Twitter, or call Nurse on Call at 800-848-5533.